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FILE - Australian $5 notes are pictured in Sydney on Sept. 10, 2022. King Charles III won’t be on Australia's new $5 bill, the nation's central bank is phasing out the British monarchy from Australian bank notes, although Charles is still expected to be on its coins.

Australia will replace the portrait of Queen Elizabeth II on its A$5 banknote with a new design to reflect and honor the history of its Indigenous culture, the country's central bank said on Thursday.

Australian authorities had said following the queen's death that the image of King Charles III would not automatically replace her on A$5 notes.

They said then she might be replaced by Australian figures.

The decision to instead honor the nation's indigenous culture follows consultation with the federal government, which supports the change, the Reserve Bank of Australia said in a statement.

The other side of the note will continue to feature the Australian Parliament, it said.

Peter Dutton, leader of the main opposition Liberal Party, said the central bank's decision was politically motivated.

"There's no question about this, that it's directed by the government and I think the Prime Minister should own up to it," he said on local radio station 2GB.

Queen Elizabeth's death last year has reignited debate in Australia about its future as a constitutional monarchy. Voters narrowly chose to maintain the British monarch as its head of state in a 1999 referendum.

Prime Minister Anthony Albanese is a long-standing republican, but had said after the death of the queen in September it was "not a time" for a debate on the role of the monarchy in Australia.

The replacement decision also comes as Australia's center - left Labor government pushes for a referendum, required to alter the constitution, to recognize Indigenous people in the document and require consultation with them on decisions that affect their lives.

"This is a massive win for the grassroots, First Nations people who have been fighting to decolonize this country," tweeted Lidia Thorpe, an opposition Green Party lawmaker of Indigenous descent.

The A$5 banknote is the only Australian banknote to carry the image of the Queen. Australian coins are mandated to carry the image of the British monarch and new coins will have the effigy of King Charles.

King Charles is the head of state in Australia, New Zealand and 12 other Commonwealth realms outside the United Kingdom, although the role is largely ceremonial.

FILE: An image of what appear to be mealworms. Even though insects are a delicacy in some parts of the world, Qatar has banned their sale as food. Taken Jan 19, 2016.

Qatar has reaffirmed a religious ban on consuming insects in a move that comes after the European Union added new products to its list of approved foods.

Academics say there is no clear ruling in Islamic law on whether insects can be eaten.

Most say locusts are halal, or allowed, as they are mentioned in the Koran.

But many Islamic law scholars reject other insects as they are considered unclean.

Qatar said that food's compliance with halal rules was checked by "Islamic bodies accredited by the ministry and through its international-accredited laboratories" that determine the source of protein contained in food products.

Insect products do not meet "the requirements of halal food technical regulations", Qatar's health ministry said in a statement late Thursday.

Gulf Cooperation Council regulations "and the religious opinion of the competent authorities" bans "the consumption of insects, or protein and supplements extracted from them", it added.

The announcement follows "some countries' decision to approve the use of insects in food production", Qatar said.

It did not identify the countries, but the EU commission last month approved the larvae of the lesser mealworm -- a species of beetle -- and a product containing the house cricket for use in food.

Insects have long been a source of protein in communities around the world but consumption has spread as pressure grows to find alternatives to meat and other foods associated with high levels of greenhouse gases.

The EU has now approved four insects as "novel food".

All products containing insects must be clearly labelled.

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