Accessibility links

Breaking News

Business and Technology

Glencore to Pay DRC Over Corruption Claims

FILE - This picture shows the Glencore headquarters in Baar, Switzerland. Taken April 14, 2011
FILE - This picture shows the Glencore headquarters in Baar, Switzerland. Taken April 14, 2011

Swiss mining giant Glencore said Monday it has agreed to pay $180 million to the Democratic Republic of Congo to cover corruption allegations, the latest payment in a series of graft cases it has faced worldwide.

The company said the $180 million settlement with DRC covers "all present and future claims arising from any alleged acts of corruption" by the Glencore Group between 2007 and 2018.

The settlement with DRC is related to investigations by the country's authorities and the US Department of Justice, Glencore said.

Glencore disclosed in 2018 that the US Justice Department had launched a corruption investigation linked to the group's business in Nigeria, Venezuela and DRC.

A year later, Britain's Serious Fraud Office said it was investigating suspicions of bribery by the Glencore group of companies and staff in DRC.

Brazil also opened a probe in 2018 into Glencore and trading groups Vitol and Trafigura over alleged bribery of employees at state-run oil company Petrobras.

In May, the group reached a settlement with Brazilian, British and US authorities, pleading guilty to corruption in Africa and South America.

Glencore agreed to pay a $700 million fine to the United States for fraud and corruption in Brazil, Cameroon, Nigeria and Venezuela, and misappropriation of confidential information in Mexico.

The company was also hit with $486 million in fines and forfeitures for oil price contract manipulation.

Last month, a UK court ordered Glencore to pay £280 million ($313 million) following an investigation into bribes paid to gain preferential access to oil in several African countries.


See all News Updates of the Day

Africa News Tonight: Senegal Faces New Election Uncertainty, African Union Discusses DRC Violence, Zimbabwe’s Government Worried About Crime

Africa News Tonight: Senegal Faces New Election Uncertainty, African Union Discusses DRC Violence, Zimbabwe’s Government Worried About Crime
please wait

No media source currently available

0:00 0:24:55 0:00
Direct link

Africa News Tonight: South African Troops Killed in DRC, China Expands Africa Outreach, Eswatini Graduates Struggle to Find Jobs

Africa News Tonight: South African Troops Killed in DRC, China Expands Africa Outreach, Eswatini Graduates Struggle to Find Jobs
please wait

No media source currently available

0:00 0:24:56 0:00
Direct link

Africa News Tonight: Wealthier Countries See More Jobless, Hunger Fight in Zimbabwe Makes Gains, Opposition Wins Court Case in South Africa

Africa News Tonight: Wealthier Countries See More Jobless, Hunger Fight in Zimbabwe Makes Gains, Opposition Wins Court Case in South Africa
please wait

No media source currently available

0:00 0:24:55 0:00
Direct link

Africa News Tonight: Kenya Begins Polio Vaccination Effort, Business Aims to Update Traditional Grains, Diplomat Sees Threats to Democracy

Africa News Tonight: Kenya Begins Polio Vaccination Effort, Business Aims to Update Traditional Grains, Diplomat Sees Threats to Democracy
please wait

No media source currently available

0:00 0:24:56 0:00
Direct link

Meta Toughens Content Curbs for Teens on Instagram, Facebook

FILE - Woman holds smartphone with Meta logo in front of a displayed Facebook's new rebrand logo Meta in this illustration picture
FILE - Woman holds smartphone with Meta logo in front of a displayed Facebook's new rebrand logo Meta in this illustration picture

WASHINGTON — Meta on Tuesday said it was tightening up content restrictions for teens on Instagram and Facebook as it faces increased scrutiny that its platforms are harmful for young people.

The changes come months after dozens of U.S. states accused Meta of damaging the mental health of children and teens, and misleading users about the safety of its platforms.

In a blog post, the company run by Mark Zuckerberg said it will now "restrict teens from seeing certain types of content across Facebook and Instagram even if it's from friends or people they follow."

This type of content would include content that discusses suicide or self-harm, as well as nudity or mentions of restricted goods, the company added.

Restricted goods on Instagram include tobacco products and weapons as well as alcohol, contraception, cosmetic procedures and weight loss programs, according to its website.

In addition, teens will now be defaulted into the most restricted settings on Instagram and Facebook, a policy that was in place for new users and that now will be expanded to existing users.

This will "make it more difficult for people to come across potentially sensitive content or accounts in places like Search and Explore," the company said.

Meta also said that it will expand its policy of hiding results to searches related to suicide and self harm to include more terms.

Leaked internal research from Meta, including by the Wall Street Journal and whistle-blower Frances Haugen, has shown that the company was long aware of dangers its platforms have on the mental health for young people.

On the platforms, teens are defined as being under eighteen, based on the date of birth they give when signing up.

Load more

XS
SM
MD
LG